Annandale Cidery

October 2014

Where's Your Cider?!

A note to our customers: In January of 2014, Montgomery Place Orchards and the Cidery reorganized as a Limited Liability Company (The Northern Spy, LLC). This change requires us to apply for amended federal permits, as well as new state licenses, label approvals, and more. Though our paperwork was submitted in March, we are still waiting on federal approval for our new permit. Unfortunately, this means that we won't be selling or participating in this year's Cider Week while we continue waiting for our updated licensing.

We apologize for any inconvenience, and thank you for your continued interest and enthusiasm in our cider. At this point, it seems unlikely everything will be in order by the time our market closes for the year, but please keep checking back as we hope to do growler Saturdays over the winter. Visits to the farm can also be arranged anytime if you'd like to check the place out. Thanks,

-Adam

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((( Atomically Correct )))

Before Prohibition, cider was America's drink. A ration for Revolutionary soldiers, a safe substitute for water along the Frontier, and even President Adams' breakfeast drink, fermented apple juice was a cheap alternative to beer and a hardy crop before the cultivation of suitable grape varieties. It was also Johnny Appleseed's true mission- apples grown from seed are inedible, but make great cider. The apple, rebranded in the 1920s by the industry as a healthy snack in order to remain a legal enterprise, virtually lost its iconic status as America's alcoholic drink. Thankfully, the country is slowly rediscovering it.

We use over 60 varieties of antique and commercial apples grown on the same land that Janet Livingston cultivated apple trees upon 200 years ago. All our cider is made in small batches, with no preservatives or sulfates added.

We are still a very small operation centered on creating great ciders as we slowly expand the business. We grow all our own apples, and focus primarily on cultivating and restoring historic American varieities to the area.

4.jpgA proud stop on the Hudson Valley Cider Route,  part of the Glynwood Center Apple Project.

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